The Power of The Peacock

12308764_10208087094156440_8767727764011878669_n.jpg

I have been fascinated with peacock feathers ever since I was a small child – I remember going to the Zoo with a dear old family friend and returning home with my prize peacock feather – I was so full of JOY at actually being able to have a REAL peacock feather ( it was the shimmering magical colours that drew me in) When I arrived home my mother went crazy, explaining how peacock feathers were bad luck and I had to remove then from the house – I was so upset… I just knew that couldn’t be true !!

They were my favourite thing after all.

I never did accept that story and chose to find out the truth for myself later on in life – In short peacocks were in fact “protectors” of palaces and would alert everyone if someone was trying to jump the palace walls – bit like a watch dog.

Here are a few more versions of why Peacock Feathers are so powerful:

In Greek mythology Argus was a monster whose body was covered with 100 eyes. Hera changed him into a peacock and his feathers were covered with eyes. The feathers symbolize the vault of heaven and all-seeing knowledge. Roman mythology sees peacocks as Juno’s birds. The coins they appear on are to denote the female lineage of princesses.

The peacock is associated with Lakshmi for Hindus. The feathers represent fortune, compassion, kindness, and patience. Kwan-yin in Asian culture is a similar figure and the feathers have similar meaning. Buddhists associate peacock feathers with openness because of the display the peacock makes when spreading its tail. Because peacocks eat poisonous plants their feathers are considered to sustain the ability to thrive in times of suffering.

Christians see resurrection, immortality, and renewal in peacock feathers. They also symbolize an all-seeing church. In Persia and Babylonia peacocks are thought to be guardians of royalty and feathers adorn thrones. Muslim legend uses feathers as a symbol in temples, the royal garden, and at the gates of paradise. Mongol warriors wore peacock feathers which caused Eastern Europe to view them as bad luck.

SONY DSC

So now I chose to allow the Resplendent Beauty of the peacock to protect me and my spirit… Thanks Mum for pushing me to always find the a truth. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.